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Macro and extreme macro photography - Microphotography

Macro Photo. Hoverfly taken with Nikon 60mm macro lens and PK-13 extension tube on the Nikon D7000.
Macro Photo. Hoverfly taken with Nikon 60mm macro lens and PK-13 extension tube on the Nikon D7000. Illuminated with Nikon macro flash kit R1C1. Aperture 22. The uptake is handheld.

Macro photos are close-ups of small things. Most macro lenses are designed so that they can achieve a magnification of 1:1 at the film plane. An insect of 8mm fills 8mm at the film plane. With equipment like bellows and extension tubes You can achieve even greater magnification. The greater the magnification the harder it is to focus properly. Depth of field (DOF) is also very small.

To solve the problem with the small depth of field, you can use the technique focus stacking. One takes a number of photos, where the focus has shifted slightly for each photo. The images are then put together in special software. What is in focus in the individual images are combined to form an image with great depth of field.

Focus stacking allows you to to get even closer to a subject, with such as a microscope lens, and still get images with great depth of field as the photo of hover fly below.

Extreme macro photo (micrograph). This hoverfly are taken with Nikon microscope objective 10X CF E attached Nikon D7000.
Extreme macro photo (micrograph). This hoverfly are taken with Nikon microscope objective 10X CF E attached Nikon D7000. Stacked of 180 images. Illuminated with nikon remote electron flash SB-700. Powered by SU-800.


Extreme macro photography with Nikon 60mm macro lens.

Macro Photo equipment. Nikon 60mm macro and intermediate rings. A SU-800 to control the remote flash. The equipment is mounted on a Stack Shot macro rail that can be programmed to take as many photos You want for focus stacking.
Macro Photo equipment. Nikon 60mm macro and intermediate rings. A SU-800 to control the remote flash. The equipment is mounted on a Stack Shot macro rail that can be programmed to take as many photos You want for focus stacking.

With close-ups for focus stacking it is important to avoid vibration, and it is important that you ensure uniform illumination.

The picture shows a Stack Shot rail that can be programmed in many ways to take the number of images of the desired distance.

Long shutter speeds easily gives vibrations of the equipment, that prevents sharp images. A flash that can last for many flashes, is often the best solutions. Some subjects are however, best photographed in natural light. The spider at the bottom is photographed in a greenhouse at daylight, with a shutter speed of 1/40, and where the mirror is raised, before the picture is taken.

Macro Photo. The photo is taken with the equipment shown above. Stacked of 70 images.
Macro Photo. The photo is taken with the equipment shown above. Stacked of 70 images. Illuminated with electronic flash SB-700.
Macro Photo taken with Nikon 60mm macro lens and extension tubes by natural light. Stacked of 80 images.
Macro Photo taken with Nikon 60mm macro lens and extension tubes by natural light. Stacked of 80 images.
 

Site 2 - Extreme macro with Nikon microscope objectives

 

 

 

 

 

About, Bird photography, Landscape and Seascape, Macro and extreme macro photography, Surreal trick photography